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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
lords. what do they get? a $1.5 billion fine. nobody gets arrested. why? they're too big to jail. brian asked about that in this report. watch this. >> this is a very just, very real and very powerful result. >> you don't think the bank got off easy? >> no, and i don't think the bank thinks it got off easy. >> $38 billion in profits over the last two years hsbc can easily afford it's payment. >> cenk: yeah, a joke. nonsense. i mean, the fact that these guys are not in jail when they're the biggest money launderers for drug straighters in the world. stephanie george is sitting in jail and has a life sentence because her exboyfriend hid cocaine in her attic. her earlier convictions were for drug transactions equalling $40 and $120. $40 and $120, life sentence. the top bankers who funneled all the money to the drug lord says, no sentence. there's just no justice in that. kneel parovski has been fighting back against that. you looked at the tarp program you were the inspector general. you came out with the assessment and you were inside the system. when you look at why hsbc does no the get
sorts of things. and oh, my gosh. if you put that one up there. good lord. no wonder, how did you pick that thing up. >> i don't know. >> this is the second largest tortoise in the world, up to 500 pounds. >> who would win in a fight. >> this one here. much bigger. they can live 200 years. >> 200 years old. >> yes. >> sailors in the 1500 would put them in the hulls of the ship because they would last without food or water. the ship must have stunk. they are the creature again. >> he's heavy, right. >> this is a male and i think this is a male, too. the bottom of the shell is flat. >> amazing. really amazing. the tortoise and the hare. >> how fast can they move. >> he went across the room in ten seconds. >> you had him in a hotel room. >> we had the alligator in a bathtub. >> jack, you are slightly mad. be honest. >> i would tell you the hotel. >> when you have an alligator in the bathtub and tortoises in your bed, you may not be the full ticket here. >> you want to do this one? >> what is this one. >> this is one of the smallest kangaroo. >> australians, right? what the hell is that? m
of things, now this animal is a protected species. let me show you, good lord. how did you pick that up? >> i don't know. >> this is the second largest tortoise in the world, up to 500 pounds. >> who would win in a fight? >> this one here, much bigger. these things can live 200 years. >> 200 years old? >> yes, yes. the sailors back in the 1500s, could put them in the hull of the ship, last them for a year with no water or food. no food, nothing, they live that long. tell you what, the ship must have stunk. >> he's heavy, right? >> this is a male, i think this one is a male too. the bottom of the shell is flat. >> amazing animals, really amazing. >> the tortoise and the hare, they are not that slow. >> how fast can they move? >> last night one was crawling across the hotel room, ten seconds. >> you have them in the hotel room? >> ain't seen nothing, alligator in the bathtub. >> what! jack, are you slightly mad? seriously, be honest. >> i want to tell you -- >> alligator in the bathtub and these tortoises in your bed. do you think to yourself, jack, you may not be the full ticket here? >>
. >> oh, lord. >> let's go back to mtv. >> that's the boy i made out. >> you made out with him? >> oh, god, this is going to get good. >> what are we doing? >> i like him after you shaved his head. >> i like to call that my beer swollen face. i was 23 right out of college, good beer fat swollen -- >> i know all about that. >> if you don't have it, you're not having fun. reality tv was not any good then. honey boo-boo has me to thank, snooki, you're welcome. i paved the way! parlay this into anything, that would be great and kept running with that. espn, little jobs here and there. >> cold pizza. >> little cold pizza. >> i followed kit hoover's career. >> you were in atlanta together, right, my hometown. >> we were, yeah, headline news. >> is it true you were most athletic and homecoming queen in atlanta? >> come on. where are you digging all this up? >> he has sources, lot of sources. >> i go deep in atlanta. >> the joke with the homecoming queen was the whole school voted and so my dad was like, you really cornered the seventh and eighth graders. and i loved playing sports. it's so neat t
culture and the drug lords and the gangsters, those who follow the music industry say she was the most influential singing star since salina. >> rivera was a hope for a lot of people in the latin community and worked a decade tire misally inspiring people and that legacy, the music, everything she did in the business will have an impression for many, many years to come, like salina. >>trace: this woman had her first chinese at the age of 16 and never released an album until she was 30. now the at age of 43 she has left a very long legacy. >>shepard: and then there is john mcafee. the software pioneer wanted for questioning with a murder has a new wish. he left the united states to lower his taxes but now that police in belize want him, he says he wants to come back to the place he left to avoid his taxes. and the matter of the dead dogs. and the dead neighbor. and live out in the jungle. all sorts of weirdness coming up. anncr: some politicians seem to think medicare and... social security are just numbers in a budget. well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if was
filibuster reform. >> oh, lord. >> democrats have been complaining about the filibuster for years now, since actually they took over the senate, and now they have a chance to get rid of the filibuster. there's nothing in the constitution. madison wrote nothing of the filibuster. but i want everybody to hear, though, because for the past four years, we have been hearing how evil the republican party is because they filibuster. >> yeah. >> harry reid, the democratic senate, senators like claire mccaskill, senators like, you know, kirsten gillibrand, senators like chuck schumer. they can all get rid of the filibuster at the beginning of january. so why don't -- if the filibuster is so evil and if the republicans are so evil for wielding the filibuster, this is very easy. just make the rules in january -- forget filibuster reform. i support getting rid of the entire filibuster. >> i agree. >> let's wipe it out. so why don't we get the democrats to get rid of the fill bust filibuster? >> because people across the country agree 100%. you get outside washington, it's a no-brainer. majority should r
said while i was there inn there, lord, just get me out of here. it wasn't an everyday prayer. it was an all-day long prayer. god, please just get me out of here alive. >> bill: how did they get you out? how did you finally get out? >> well, after three different lawyers and pain, these three different lawyers, 70 to $80,000 in american money, none of these -- one of them actually got one of the charges dropped. but i'm still charged with possession of controlled substance. and after 70, $80,000, they all took the money and ran. i actually am thankful to my aunt, my aunt consistently called the united states consulate. after a period of time of calling them and calling them and calling them, they told me i could put in for a transfer and i put in for a transfer. two years, 2 1/2 years after i was in there. after i did put in the transfer, i got transferred out of there by the united states consulate. >> bill: so they got you out of the country? >> they got me out of the country. >> bill: after all the pressure that your aunt put on them. that's what's going to have to happen i
a number of studies, very large studies done with autistic children. dr. catherine lord spoke with one this morning "the new york times" and went through the whole thing thoroughly. the result of it is that there is less likelihood of a child with autism to have an aggression against other people than there is for typical children, so not only is there no evidence that supports the fact that they are violent to other people, but they are actually less violent towards other people than typical people and when you really get into these stories about violence and you see children or young adults, what you're going to see generally is people with alcohol or drug problems or some other situation. they're seven to ten times more likely to be violent than typical children and autistic children are less so. sometimes, they are self injurious, but rarely to other people. these kinds of generalizations are killing us. these parents of children with autism, they're frightened, angry. people are talking about you know, autism as though they're acquainted with it. they're using it as a generalizati
for medal and everything else. >> good lord, alan. do you want to have elementary schools like the west wing of the white house. >> that's right, we need today -- and that's true in other parts of the world. today, we got used to it. look at buildings. you go to visit a law firm today, you can't just walk up to see the partner. you have to go and present i.d. it's the reality of life. it's far less restrictive of freedom if we have that, than if we start locking people up based on suspicion. start controlling video games. i think there are things that we can do to make sure school safer, they will require compromises with convenience. >> okay. one final very quick question for you, jeffrey, just struck me listening to this debate about the second amendment. given it's so open to different interpretations. i read both arguments, you can argue it both ways. is there an argument for the second amendment to be repealed and to be clarified and be redrafted? could that happen? >> absolutely. the constitution can always be amended but you want to see a revolution in this country. i mean, the second
around. always. >> reporter: rivera's mother says she is sure her daughter is now singing to the lord. in lakewood, california, teresa garcia, wjz eyewitness news. >> reporter: now, rivera's family says one of her brothers will go to mexico today to meet with investigators to try to identify the singer's body. >>> well, updating the story we told you about at the top of the newscast, a shakeup with the ravens today. the ravens fire offensive coordinator cam cameron. he had run the ravens' offense the last five year, hired after cam cameron took over as coach. cameron was fired for inconsistencies. but head coach john harbaugh said you cannot point to one specific game. minutes ago, harbaugh talked to reporters. >> it's really important to point out. it would be really easy to go the route of saying, it's a result of something and somebody is taking the blame for something. it is not that. people are going to believe what they want to believe. it's what i believe is best going forward for our offensive and for our football team. >> we'll have much m
to fool you ♪ ♪ and even though it all went wrong i stand before the lord absolved hallelujah ♪ ♪ hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah hallelujah ♪ >>> "outfront" next, the latest on the investigation into the newtown shootings. and we have new details tonight on the suspected gunman. what we have been learning from his autopsy, from an autopsy of his brain and from a close friend. >>> plus, the hero teacher, vicky soto. what she did for her kids. >>> later, in the face of horror, citizens around the world have come together to make a difference. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett in newtown, connecticut. "outfront" searching for answers. that's what we've all been doing, trying to understand how this happened and why it happened. investigators in connecticut returned to the home of the gunman. the suspected gunman, 20-year-old adam lanza, searching for evidence. so far, authorities have been unable to retrieve any information from his computer, which was found smashed to pieces in the house he lived in with his mother, nancy. now, investigator
and lord knows it will go down if they don't get this thing figured out. danielle nottingham live in d.c., thank you. >>> and remember, you can keep tabs on the "fiscal cliff" talks 24/7 by logging on to our website. >>> a new health problem for secretary of state hillary clinton. she has a blood clot. she is in the hospital in new york this morning. the clot was discovered yesterday in a follow-up exam following the concussion she had this month. her spokesman says the clot is related to the concussion but is not saying exactly where that clot is located. she is being treated with anticoagulants and will stay in the hospital for the next couple of days. >>> on the scene of developing news in san francisco this morning, cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran is in the excelsior district where a suspicious fire is under investigation. >>> reporter: firefighters are calling it suspicious because of how quickly the flames spread. you can see now crews are still here. we heard reports that residents did admit to having an illegal marijuana grow operation but an arson team will be investigat
, and the shark is now the most recommended vacuum brand in america. >> lord love a duck. is there anything it doesn't do? >> it doesn't cost $600. >> hey... [comical drumbeat] >> announcer: the trouble with most vacuums? as soon as you turn them on they begin to clog and lose suction. and they're so heavy and hard to steer. dyson solved those problems with their no loss of suction and steering technology, but those solutions cost nearly $600. two years ago shark introduced their amazing lift-away upright which truly revolutionized the vacuum industry because it too offered no loss of suction and swivel steering technology. but it also featured a sealed system, and it converted into a lightweight and portable vacuum, all for one-third the price of a dyson. even after two years of home usage, the result is over 95% of shark owners still recommend it to a friend. go online yourself to see all the four- and five-star reviews the shark has earned. all this proudly made shark the most recommended vacuum in america. and now shark has redefined the vacuum industry again! introducing the all-new, r
. >> stephanie: jim i say it. >> oh, lord. [ ♪ "world news tonight" ♪ ] it. >> stephanie: he already ignores me and we don't have sex. australia is an excellent example, jim. it actually says jim in here which is weird. >> that is bizarre. >> stephanie: it is an example, jim. >> new zealand. >> close enough. >> stephanie: in 1996, a lone gunman killed 35 people from a semi-automatic weapon. within weeks, the australian government was working to ban assault weapons. tightened licensing had gun amnesty and buyback programs. guess what. the laws have worked. firearm homicides in australia quite coincidentally have dropped 59% between 1995 and 2006. in the years before, there were 13 gun massacres resulting in 102 deaths with none in that category since. that would be none! >> zero. zilch! >> stephanie: okay. 16 children and their teacher were killed by a gunman in scotland in 1996. the british government banned all private ownership of automatic weapons and virtually all handguns. guess what. the result
, which marks the birth of their lord and savior jesus christ. here's a live look at bethlehem, where people are beginning to gather for the midnight mass at the church of the holy nativity. bethlehem is described in the bible as the birth place of jesus. about 2 million people make the pilgrimage to bethlehem each and every year. pope benedict expected to deliver his christmas mass in just a few hours at st. peter's basilica in rome. he has a book out debunking several myths about now the nativity unfolded. for one thing, he says the accepted date of jesus' birth is several years off. he points to a 6th century monk for the mix-up. >>> shoppers are flocking to the mall for another christmas tradition, that would be last-minute shopping. about 17 million people expected to be in the malls today. many may find good bargains too. alison kosik is in new york. you probably get the best price on things today. >> you would think so. if you ever had any doubts that we're not a nation of procrastinators, think again. 17 million people out in the stores just today. believe it or not, it's not
specialist tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 will help you get started today. >> at 21 minutes past the hour, i am lord green with gearbox used minute. the colorado resident was abducted by the taliban and while conducting a humanitarian mission. president obama released a statement praising them. jenny rivera that this morning after a private plane she was traveling on crashed in mexico. she has been nominated for three latin grammys. the radio news website says it has been hit especially hard due to un sanctions. dagen: more on those sanctions against iran. iran is in a recession because nations are not buying oil from the country. connell: expected to shrink 3.5% this year. that is what is going on over there. let's bring in colonel oliver north in. is this all good news or surely >> i want to give it as a cautionary tale. what those in our administration think that economic sanctions alone, which, no doubt have caused this recession. exhibit number one, north korea. grass is the vegetable. the economy of north korea -- connell: there is still an issue. >> they have not stopped from building nuclear
mints. thanks a lot. the highly anticipated prequel to "the lord of the rings" trilogy "the hobbit" opens today and mgm and time warner have a lot riding on "middle earth." julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> well, carl, bilbo bagins is under a lot of pressure. not only does he have to free a dwarf kingdom but mgm is counting on him to pave the way for its ipo. mgm held off plans to go public hoping strong performances from skyfall and the hobbit trilogy would bolster the valuation. it is expected that mgm will file for an ipo in march or april between the flood of revenue from skyfall and the hobbit. despite some mediocre reviews the 3 $d the hobbit an unexpected journey is expected to set a record for the biggest ever opening in december with north of $88 million. mgm needs the three hobbit films to live up to the $3 billion lord of the rings trilogy because mgm has bet big on its potential. it borrowed half a billion dollars in february and spent another $590 million in july to buy out icon's 25% stake in the company. time warner also has a lot riding on hobbit. its new
. you know, they're going to make it like the trilogy. >> the same thing. >> lord of the rings. like the lord of the rings. we'll know everything that we want to know about bilbao. we read the hobbit all together. we're reading that. and i think the first one goes to where the eagles transport them away from the wolves. >> i haven't read the hobbit. >> you haven't head the hobbit? you didn't read it in high school? yeah, i read it in high school. >> i feed a feel-good movie. >> el capitan, che guevara. >> let's talk shopping. shoppers hit the stores for the last time before christmas today. dana telsey is the ceo and chief officer of telsey group. we saw you day after thanksgiving, you said there was going to be sort of a hot -- that weekend was going to be big, there was going to be a lull, and it was all going to come back. has it turned out that way for you, dana? >> i think some of it came back. i don't think all of it came back. i think it was a tougher season than expected. you think you had the long calendar, the hurricane sandy, the track dpi in connecticut, people had a lot
about and you could see the reflection in england, permanent power in the monarch, property in the lords, numbers in the commons, an emerging independent judiciary. so i thought maybe not so easy to get a patent, even though i said it was a brilliant implementation. but federalism, clearly a unique contribution and in another place i said it was a unique contribution of the framers, a political theory. the framer had the idea you had more freedom if you have two governments instead of one, you almost get intellectual whiplash. why more freedom if you have two governments? 3 now, many students think of federalism as being a brilliant administrative device this was the biggest landmass since the roman empire to attempt a unified government and it took, what, six weeks to get from new england to south carolina. so if you're a businessperson or astute manager, you have territorial divisions in a certain sense. and in the 160's and 1970's when european states persons and scholars were looking at american federalism to see if they could find some lessons for the european union, many of them th
easily. >> you're a smart guy. gregg: i graduated in the top 98 of my chance. >> thank the lord i've never been out of work one day as a lawyer. so this isn't sour grapes but at the same time you can't put on blinders and say you can't recognize what i would say is the fraud that is being perpetrated on these students who are graduating today. gregg: the other thing that's changed is, law schools, some of them were free. mine was free, the university of california. nobody is free nowadays. i know you're laughing at it. >> you got a free ride. >> i'm lucky they let me n. >> uc was free. nobody is free now. so these kids are graduating with huge bills, they'll never get out from under. >> nobody who goes to law school plans on being a lawyer, they plan on using the degree in the legal world, entrepreneurs, whatever it may be. i've sat in on the meetings, i've looked at materials, it tells you this statistic is based on a response of 30% of last year's graduate. gregg: last word, tom. >> the fine print may be there but it's the practice itself. every state has an unfair deception and
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)